BestFlag 5 Examples of Awesome Brand Refreshes Part 2

BestFlag 5 Examples of Awesome Brand Refreshes Part 2

November 30, 2018

In the last post, we began looking at great examples of brand refreshes. 

For a brand refresh to work, it needs to maintain elements of what customers recognize. But it needs to speak visually to what they’re looking for now. And a brand refresh needs to reflect what you think your company is about. 

Let’s take a look at a couple more refreshes, then we’ll talk about when a brand refresh makes sense.

Chobani Delivers The Entire Package

Brand refreshes aren’t just about logos. The best-considered among them look to update the entire look

Launched in the US in 2007, Chobani Greek-style yogurt quickly grew to become the best-selling yogurt in the U.S. In a move that was arguably 180 degrees different than that of Airbnb, Chobani moved toward a more playful, almost throwback approach to its logo, color palette, signage and more.

 

Everything received a facelift based on the new look, including, from packaging and signage to less-seen-by-the-public elements like employee logo wear and more.

Source for all Chobani images: Under Consideration’s Brand New

So complete, compelling and consistent was the refresh that UnderConsideration.com, a leading site for critique of new logos and brand identities literally gushed about it.

The corporate and marketing materials and lovely too, from the simplicity of the stationery — centered typography, OMG! — to the richness of the employee handbooks to the playfulness of the tote and buttons. The identity can work on different visual wavelengths but it all feels consistent and coherent.

In fact, anyone thinking about rebadging or refreshing their brand would do well to review the entire critique here. 

The Takeaway: Make sure your refresh looks at all the different ways your customers interact with your identity. Then prioritize which elements need to change, starting with those most publicly visible.  But don’t forget that your employees are part of your audience too.

Southwest Simplifies 

Ubiquitous low-cost airline Southwest has succeeded where most other carriers have failed in creating an airline that enjoys strong brand loyalty. Much of this has come from consistently reinforcing its “luv” of its passengers and employees.  Its brand refresh in 2014 chose to lean heavily on this emotional appeal.

While this version of SWA’s branding had been with us since 1998, the airline made the bold choice to drop the familiar blue and red-orange plane in favor of the stylized heart that decorates every plane in the fleet.

 

 

 

The Takeaway: Don’t be afraid to use your refresh to explore a different dimension of your brand. Whether it’s “luv” or service, or price, a brand refresh is an excellent opportunity to give more voice to what you’re trying to be about.

Refresh vs. Rebrand - What’s The Difference?

Maybe the color and design of your web store was decided five years ago (which is actually twenty-three years ago in internet years.) Or a refocusing of your business’s mission makes your existing branding look and feel just a bit out of step. In situations like this, a brand refresh might be precisely what’s needed. A brand refresh tends to be more cosmetic in nature. 

As such, you’ll be looking at making changes to the most elements of your company’s branding. 

  • Signage, displays, and banners
  • Logo, business cards, and stationery
  • Website
  • Apps
  • Promotional items
  • Advertising and sponsorship materials

Your brand is an articulation of what your entire business is about, and it’s made up of so many things.  It’s your positioning in the market you serve. It’s the products or services you sell. It’s your approach to customer service, your ads, emails, promotions, even your community engagement.  Rebranding is a wholesale retooling of this entire universe. 

Put another way: 

Refreshing your brand is a fresh coat of paint and landscaping to improve the curb appeal of your house. It’s your house, fresh and renewed.  

Relaunching your brand is more akin to a complete, down-to-the-studs renovation; tearing out the walls, converting the family room to an in-law suite. 

As the calendar year wraps up, maybe it’s time to rethink your own brand. Unless your business has changed in fundamental ways, you’re likely best served by a brand refresh. The time from start to finish is usually quicker, the costs lower, and the impact more immediately visible

 

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